5 of the Most Common — and 4 Surprising — Causes of Birth Defects

mom and positive pregnancy test

A birth defect — also called a congenital anomaly — is a problem that occurs when a baby is developing in the womb. An estimated one out of every 33 babies in the U.S. is born with a birth defect, of varying severity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

If you’re a mom-to-be — or planning to be — it’s important to understand what causes birth defects and the steps you can take to prevent them during pregnancy. Here’s an overview of the most common causes of birth defects:

It’s Time to Get Rid of Those Painful Varicose Veins

varicose vein before and afterYou may notice veins that bulge or look twisted (varicose veins) in your legs. Your legs may ache or swell. Sometimes they may also feel heavy and tired, or like they’re burning. You’re not too happy with the way they look either. What is a girl to do?

Don’t fret. There are options (for men too) to help lessen the pain, prevent swelling and even boost your confidence when heading out in your favorite shorts.

The Benefits of CBD: Fact or Fiction?

CBD productsWith the recent legalization of marijuana in Massachusetts, the cannabis industry has been booming. CBD or cannabidiol products haven’t only been used for recreation, but many believe that these oils, gummies and topicals may serve as natural remedies for the fol:

  • Pain
  • Inflammation
  • Anxiety
  • Epilepsy
  • Depression
  • Acne

Additionally, many individuals have confidence that CBD products may help those who suffer from autism or other neurobehavioral disorders, easing hypersensitivities to things, such as light and sound.

But, do they work?

Do Fitness Trackers Really Work?

arm with fitness trackerAccording to industry research, roughly one-quarter of U.S. adults (nearly 57 million people) use a fitness tracker — those wearable devices that record your daily physical activity along with other health data, such as heart rate or calories burned.

But the question is: Do these ubiquitous bits of technology really make us more fit and healthy?